Since late 2016 we have entered the age of disclosures! Fasten your mental safety belt and enjoy the ride! Heretic

Tuesday, October 31, 2017

Low-salt diet increases insulin resistance in healthy subjects

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Interesting study:


Low-salt diet increases insulin resistance in healthy subjects.
Garg R1, Williams GH, Hurwitz S, Brown NJ, Hopkins PN, Adler GK., Metabolism. 2011 Jul;60(7)


From Wiki Salt



Quote:

Abstract
Low-salt (LS) diet activates the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and sympathetic nervous systems, both of which can increase insulin resistance (IR). We investigated the hypothesis that LS diet is associated with an increase in IR in healthy subjects. Healthy individuals were studied after 7 days of LS diet (urine sodium < 20 mmol/d) and 7 days of high-salt (HS) diet (urine sodium > 150 mmol/d) in a random order. Insulin resistance was measured after each diet and compared statistically, unadjusted and adjusted for important covariates. One hundred fifty-two healthy men and women, aged 39.1 ± 12.5 years (range, 18-65) and with body mass index of 25.3 ± 4.0 kg/m(2), were included in this study. Mean (SD) homeostasis model assessment index was significantly higher on LS compared with HS diet (2.8 ± 1.6 vs 2.4 ± 1.7, P < .01). Serum aldosterone (21.0 ± 14.3 vs 3.4 ± 1.5 ng/dL, P <  .001), 24-hour urine aldosterone (63.0 ± 34.0 vs 9.5 ± 6.5 μg/d, P < .001), and 24-hour urine norepinephrine excretion (78.0 ± 36.7 vs 67.9 ± 39.8 μg/d, P < .05) were higher on LS diet compared with HS diet. Low-salt diet was significantly associated with higher homeostasis model assessment index independent of age, sex, blood pressure, body mass index, serum sodium and potassium, serum angiotensin II, plasma renin activity, serum and urine aldosterone, and urine epinephrine and norepinephrine. Low-salt diet is associated with an increase in IR [insulin resistance]. The impact of our findings on the pathogenesis of diabetes and cardiovascular disease needs further investigation.

1 comment :

dav0 said...

I just had a thought. I wonder if in this or any of the other salt intake studies you referred to recently, did they use iodised table salt? If they did could there actually be a secondary effect of Iodine here too?