Since late 2016 we have entered the age of disclosures! Fasten your mental safety belt and enjoy the ride! Heretic

Sunday, November 12, 2017

Dr. Andrew Wakefield's talk at the 2016 HP Conference

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Graph from the video above

3 comments :

JC said...

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23633321

Stan Bleszynski said...

Hi JC,

Thanks for the link. It was only 4 weeks. The question is how to reconcile that with the long term observational statistics (see my previous post). I would be worried about basing the long term guidelines on short term studies, it could be like with veganism or moderate alcohol or recreational marihuana when the short terms effects are positive but long term are very detrimental.

Regards,
Heretic

Stan Bleszynski said...

Also, the effect was quite small. For such a drastic reduction, blood pressure was quite modest, especially in non-hypertensives:

Quote:

...in hypertensives, the mean effect was -5.39 mmHg (95% CI: -6.62 to -4.15, I (2)=61%) for systolic and -2.82 mmHg (95% CI: -3.54 to -2.11, I (2)=52%) for diastolic BP.

In normotensives, the mean effect was -2.42 mmHg (95% CI: -3.56 to -1.29, I (2)=66%) for systolic and -1.00 mmHg (95% CI: -1.85 to -0.15, I (2)=66%) for diastolic BP.

Even in case of hypertensive, a mean -5.39mmHg/-2.28mmHg change is very small. For example if one has got 160/80 it would lower the averages only to 155/78, the change would be probably unnoticeable given a measuring accuracy. In people with hypertension, the biggest problem is unstable pressure, or occasional dangerously high blood pressure peaks. I wonder if there are studies dealing with that?