The further a society drifts from the truth, the more it will hate those who speak it. ... In a time of deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act. George Orwell

Monday, June 13, 2016

High cholesterol does not cause heart disease new research finds...statins waste of time

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From US FDA

High cholesterol 'does not cause heart disease' new research finds, so treating with statins a 'waste of time'


Quote:
13 JUNE 2016 • 1:01AM
Cholesterol does not cause heart disease in the elderly and trying to reduce it with drugs like statins is a waste of time, an international group of experts has claimed.
A review of research involving nearly 70,000 people found there was no link between what has traditionally been considered “bad” cholesterol and the premature deaths of over 60-year-olds from cardiovascular disease.
Published in the BMJ Open journal, the new study found that 92 percent of people with a high cholesterol level lived longer.
Lowering cholesterol with medications is a total waste of time
Professor Sherif Sultan, University of Ireland
The authors have called for a re-evaluation of the guidelines for the prevention of cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis, a hardening and narrowing of the arteries, because “the benefits from statin treatment have been exaggerated”.



Lack of an association or an inverse association between low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and mortality in the elderly: a systematic review


Quote:
Abstract
Objective It is well known that total cholesterol becomes less of a risk factor or not at all for all-cause and cardiovascular (CV) mortality with increasing age, but as little is known as to whether low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), one component of total cholesterol, is associated with mortality in the elderly, we decided to investigate this issue.
Setting, participants and outcome measures We sought PubMed for cohort studies, where LDL-C had been investigated as a risk factor for all-cause and/or CV mortality in individuals ≥60 years from the general population.
Results We identified 19 cohort studies including 30 cohorts with a total of 68 094 elderly people, where all-cause mortality was recorded in 28 cohorts and CV mortality in 9 cohorts. Inverse association between all-cause mortality and LDL-C was seen in 16 cohorts (in 14 with statistical significance) representing 92% of the number of participants, where this association was recorded. In the rest, no association was found. In two cohorts, CV mortality was highest in the lowest LDL-C quartile and with statistical significance; in seven cohorts, no association was found.
Conclusions High LDL-C is inversely associated with mortality in most people over 60 years. This finding is inconsistent with the cholesterol hypothesis (ie, that cholesterol, particularly LDL-C, is inherently atherogenic). Since elderly people with high LDL-C live as long or longer than those with low LDL-C, our analysis provides reason to question the validity of the cholesterol hypothesis. Moreover, our study provides the rationale for a re-evaluation of guidelines recommending pharmacological reduction of LDL-C in the elderly as a component of cardiovascular disease prevention strategies.

2 comments :

August said...

Good. I decided to ignore high cholesterol levels. I have something wrong, and buttermilk seems to calm it somewhat. The buttermilk seems to help my gut. I got a blood test because I'm worried about what the hell it could really be- I.B.S. is not a diagnosis in my opinion, but a euphemism for 'we can't find anything.'

So I get the blood test, all the stuff I was worried about was better, but there's my cholesterol at 234, and, apparently more of the 'bad' kind than the mainstream would like. Thankfully I didn't have to listen to one of these idiot doctors who can't fix me lecture me about cholesterol.

Stan Bleszynski said...

Right decision. High cholesterol is by itself not a risk factor, even for people with hyperlipidemia. There was a Dutch study that analyzed longevity of known families with familial hyperlipidemia and found that they lived as long or longer than average population. sine 1800-dreds, except the 1930-ties and 40-ties when the diet was skewed heavily towards potatoes (depression and then during the war meat was very hard to buy). I suspect that people with naturally high cholesterol do not tolerate high carbohydrate diets.
Stan